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Archive for the 'Email Marketing' Category

Insight Into The Customer Lifetime Value of Your Digital Customers

A recent study from marketing company Custora, who analyzes customer retention and acquisition, provided insight into the lifetime value of customers, based on the digital medium from which the customer came.

The study shows shows the varying Customer Lifetime Value of digital customers, with PPC (Pay Per Click), referral and even e-mail topping the list, beating out Facebook and Twitter in regards to obtaining a higher quality customer.

alt="Customer Lifetime Value Chart"

For customers seeking a product or service via the search engines directly (IE: Google) or click on ad specifically of what they are looking for, these results are easy to account for because those channels utilize the intent graph (the consumer is looking for something specific). Social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter will have to use their graph searches to redirect the customer to the product or service they seek.

Another result that came out of this study is that rural area customers tend to be more valuable and loyal over time, as their choices of vendors are more limited due to their living area. The Wyoming customer, for example, is 28% more valuable than the average American.

Tips for the Restoration Contractor:

While this study proves to have compelling information to help you see where valuable customers through digital efforts can come from, it’s important to incorporate a variety of digital and non-digital tactics to not only prospect for new business, but also, to make sure that they will be the kind of customer you want. The study makes a strong point for digital marketers to not put all their eggs in one or two baskets, in particular, Facebook and Twitter, who have made great strides to provide advertising, targeting tools and other strides in order to build a stronger (and more profitable) user community.

While SEO and PPC can bring in several to handfuls of leads a week, are you finding that those customers are jobs you are wanting to take on? Recently, we spoke with a prospective client who was receiving numerous leads a week through their PPC efforts, but 90% were the types of jobs they did not want, and thus, their return on investment was not what they had hoped for either.

On the flip side, we also have restoration contractor clients who see decent work come through their digital marketing efforts. But, it’s part of their overall marketing mix, and contributes as another source of business. As we mentioned before at the beginning of this blog…don’t put all your eggs in one (or two) baskets!

The most effective way to ensure a steady and predictable stream of work is to make sure that you not only have the right tactics in place (SEO, PPC, Direct Marketing Tactics, etc.), but also, the right sales reps in place and a dynamic way to hire, train, coach and manage them. Check out this article on “How Managing Your Salespeople is Different From Your Techs” to give you a flavor of what we are talking about.

And most of all, you’ve got to have a strategy as the foundation of your marketing plan, that supports the tactics and the sales force.

If you’re a restoration contractor looking to predictably grow your business, you should take a few minutes to visit us at www.gobda.com. While we’re not the perfect fit for everyone, we are a sales and marketing consulting agency helping restorers all over the country through proven and proprietary programs that help them to generate millions in new business. Now doesn’t that sound like an egg you want to have in your basket?

Mobile Technology Adaption Growing in Small Businesses

A recent Constant Contact survey shows a strong trend among small business owners who are using mobile technology to not only conduct business, but also to promote their business, with conducting social media marketing (73%) and email marketing (71%) at the top of the list.

Other uses include engaging in advertising through social media outlets, as well as having a mobile-friendly site. A smaller percentage of the survey participants use tablets for point-of-sale purposes and use mobile apps to manage their business. 82% using a calendar/time management app tops the list of types of apps used, with others reporting app usage in customer communications, GPS/mapping, accounting/invoicing, travel planning and industry news updates.

In regards to social media advertising, a whopping 97% of those surveyed utilize many of the “biggies” of social media for advertising dollars: YouTube, Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

For those that have mobile-friendly sites, 70% of participants reported that it’s not only mobile-friendly, but also social-media optimized. Other characteristics of these sites include:

-A Menu (44%)
-Individual Product Listings (40%)
-Videos (39%)

And, when it comes to what type of mobile device is choice among small business owners, iOS is still heads above the Android. (66% to 39% respectively). In tablets, iPad beats out the Android tablet, 49% to 15% respectively.

Now, not all small businesses are behind the mobile trend, and for various reasons, with the top reason (56%) being that their customers have not expressed demand for mobile communications. 28% said mobile is not relevant to their industry/business.

For the restoration contractor, there are many opportunities for both their sales and marketing force plus their operations team to benefit from the many advantages of mobile technology. Learning curves, costs of the technology itself and having very little time to learn and adapt to mobile technology are just some of the reasons why contractors, much like the non-mobile users in the owners surveyed, have not employed this trend into their own businesses. But, as any business knows, it’s vital to stay ahead of the curve for business trends that have a direct impact on best servicing their customers.

In an ever-increasing world dependent on technology, it will be critical for small business owners to adapt to mobile changes before their customers start demanding it-and for the company, to adapt to mobile technology before they get left behind while the competition roars ahead.

If you are a contractor or a company in the inspection, cleaning and restoration industry, and have found that what was working to grow your company from point A to point B is not working to get you to point C, Business Development Associates, Inc. might be the solution for you. We are helping companies across the country predictably control the growth of their companies with proprietary sales and marketing programs that are generating millions in new business. Email us at info@thebdaway.com or call us at 773-777-9956 today!

Don’t Miss These Upcoming BDA Sales & Marketing Seminars!

Don’t miss these upcoming BDA Sales & Marketing Seminars, where you can learn powerful strategies to predictably grow your business to the next level!

Contractor Connection 2013 Conference & Expo
May 21-23; San Antonio, Texas
Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
Tim Miller, President of BDA, Will Be Presenting the Course:
“5 Stages of Small Business Growth for a Restoration Contractor”
https://www.contractorconnection.com/contractorconference/Breakouts.aspx

Business growth often triggers other business challenges. Business owners tend to approach growing their company as one long continuum from the day they open to the day they retire. When in fact, there are distinct stages of growth, with different challenges, stressors, and potential outcomes. Growing companies can greatly profit from advanced knowledge of the challenges they are likely to face at each step.

This course will explore the five stages of growth for a small business while applying it to our specific industry. Detailed explanation of what each stage looks like, and suggested steps to successfully navigate those transitions, will be included in this course. Learn More About This Course By Clicking Here!

Sales Mastery For Restorers
August 7th; Columbus, Ohio
Cleanserv/Interlink Supply Classroom
Tim Miller, President of BDA, Will Be Presenting the Course:
“Sales Mastery for Restorers”
Hosted by: Totally Booked University/Jeff Cross, Senior Editor of Cleanfax Magazine

http://www.carpetcleaningrestorationmarketing.com/sales-mastery.html

This one-day course will teach show you how to increase sales by implementing a powerful, real world selling system that has been customized for the restoration salespeople and their targets! The course is hosted by Totally Booked University and Jeff Cross, Senior Editor of Cleanfax Magazine.

It has never been more important to maximize the ability of your sales team to deliver business. Most restorers agree that the average water loss is $3,000 with at least a 50% profit margin. That means that every sale you don’t bring in is costing you $1,500 or more! Plus, sales salaries and expenses add up quickly and you need to deliver a strong return.

Sales training isn’t new. But, sales training designed from the ground up just for restoration contractor salespeople is! There is no other program like this available anywhere! Click Here To Learn More About This Course!

If you have any questions about these upcoming courses and workshops, you can reach us at 773-777-9956 or email us at info@theBDAway.com.

We look forward to seeing you!

Free Webinar: Generating New Business

Register today for this free event, happening on February 27th at 3PM EST!

Brought to you by Cleanfax Magazine, this webinar will provide multiple guidelines and best practices for marketing your business in 2013 so you can position your company for growth this year.

Included on the panel of thought leaders will be Tim Miller, President of Business Development Associates, Inc. Other presenters include Chuck Violand, Steve Marsh and Jeff Cross.

See you at the webinar! Click here to register now!

The Email Inbox Battle: How Do You Go To Marketing War?

Most, if not all, companies will have a marketing & sales mix that will include email communications as part of their strategic outreach. And email is a great tool-it’s low-cost and can reach your prospects quickly (individually or in mass), regardless of whether they are in front of the computer at their desk or simply checking their email on a mobile device. You can include links, attachments and other techniques in addition to whatever copy you choose to further engage them with your brand outside of that email.

And it’s so simple, right? You piece together your email, get your contacts organized, and hit the send button. Now all you have to do is sit back and watch the business roll in.

Well, there’s just one problem. You’re sending your email, or in the spirit of this blog posting, your “soldier” into a battle that’s located inside your prospect’s inbox. And of course, there are lots of other “soldiers” being sent into battle from your competition, all vying for the attention and ultimately the business of your prospect.

Now, it’s important to remember that a marketing mix is a mix of different activities for a reason. Like humans who cannot ultimately live on water alone, restoration contractors cannot live on email alone to promote and grow their company. It’s one of the many marketing “battles” you will be a part of in order to win the overall war and win a prospect’s business.

But, time and time again, we’ve seen many restorers put a lot of energy into this sole aspect of their sales prospecting and marketing. (Among B2B marketers, 61% are using email for primarily drip communications). And not surprisingly, it has very little return. It’s really important to sharpen each aspect of your mix in order to get the best overall output of ROI from all of your sales & marketing efforts.

For now, let’s focus on how to go into battle better with your email efforts. First, let’s put a few things in perspective of why it’s important to look at your current email communications and why or why they may not be getting the impact you desire.

One recent survey of over five million emails shows that the average email user receives 147 messages every day (and that number probably increases even more for some folks!). Also, the average email user will spends more than 2.5 hours on email a day. On average, 71 of those are deleted, which takes no more than 5 minutes.

Out of the average 147 emails we get, only 12 typically require any substantial work and those messages can consume up to 90 minutes a day. As you can see, you’ve got a lot of competition not only from competitors, but of course, their daily work emails.

Ok, so now that we have an idea of how many “soldiers” are marching into battle, how do you position your B2B email communication for effectiveness? Here’s some tips on how to make sure you are one of, or the, last man standing:

1) Send your email at a more effective time of the day and during the week. Here’s some quick figures from one study:

44% reported they received the most email “opens” on a Tuesday. 53% say Friday is the worst day for email open rates.

53% reported the best time of day to receive the most “opens” was 8AM-12PM, with possible peak times before the office opens officially and during lunch(most people tend to read more email during the day in the afternoon or evening) Surprisingly, 20% of marketers forget about time zones when planning emails and also campaigns!

2) Test What Works Best For You

Each company, even if in a similar industry or marketing a similar product, will vary of what works best in maximizing their email efforts. Utilizing some analytical tools and/or doing a bit of gumshoe work can help you pinpoint the most effective days and times of the week to send emails. That would include also looking at which email had not only the best open rates, but the best click-through rates.

Different content can also garner a different response. Try mixing up your content within the emails that you can increase your chances of the prospect finally noticing you amongst the others and responding!

65% of B2B marketers will use targeted messaging in their mix, which means the next email (or other task) sent will be based on how the prospect responds. Behavioral segmentation and cross-platform testing can also be used to improve the efficacy of your emails.

3) Figure Out: “What do I say?”

This is a big question everyone has at some point no matter what their marketing & sales activity.Think about those other “soldiers” that are being sent to the inbox battle by your competitors. What do you think they are saying? Now, look at what you are about to say in the content of your email, and ask yourself this: “Is what I’m saying any different from those guys? Is this what every other restoration contractor is saying to this same person that I am trying to get business from?”

If your answer is “yes,” well, there’s good and bad news. The good news: You don’t have to feel like you’re the only one basically saying “I’m like every other restoration contractor” in their communications. The bad news: You’re one of many saying “I’m like every other restoration contractor” in their communications. And unfortunately, you are losing the battle of trying to stand out to that prospect as being unique and different, and offering something of above and beyond value to them.

These are just a few of the methods you can start utilizing to improve your email communication methods, and to help you not only have a better chance of winning the email inbox battles, but also the overall marketing war!

If you are interested in finding out a new and different way to predictably grow your business using a proven and proprietary sales and marketing solution, contact Business Development Associates, Inc. today: Visit www.theBDAway.com or www.gobda.com for more information on how you won’t have to go into battle alone!

Mobile and Tablet Usage Rising-Is It Right For Your Mix?

There is no question that smartphones and tablets have not only revolutionized how we engage with each other both personally and in business, but both technologies continue to provide greater marketing opportunities for both B2B and B2C purposes. And everywhere you look, it seems that everyone has one, and for those that are has a lower adaptability rate, (for example, the Silent Generation), they too are gradually increasing in their consumption of the latest technology.

And for marketers, increased mobile and tablet usage means the ability to leverage various tactics and strategies in order to communicate and provide interactive opportunities with their company, from QR codes, push messaging, Mobile Apps, mobile and tablet friendly Websites, sharing abilities, interactive TV, mobile banner ad opportunities, location-based marketing and much more.

For the consumer, the immediate gratification of finding information or products they want is also a big plus, as they can quickly perform a Google Search or buy the item they just saw on TV or in a magazine in a matter of minutes. For the company that consumer is buying from, the ability to maximize on the consumer’s impulse and need for immediate information or for the product itself can be result in shorter buy cycles and quicker profit. And to top all this, the rising market penetration rates of both mobile devices and tablets have marketers looking at a way to start shifting part of their marketing mix over to this new communications platform.

To give you an idea of how entrenched mobile and tablet technology is here in the U.S., below is a quick snapshot of US smartphone users and penetration into the population from 2010 and projected into 2016. In 2010, smartphones were used by 20.2% of the population, where in 2013 it will have jumped to 48.9%. In 2016, it’s projected that nearly 60% will have a smartphone.

- 2010: 62.2 million (26.9% of mobile phone users / 20.2% of population)
- 2011: 93.1 million (39.2% / 29.7%)
- 2012: 115.8 million (47.7% / 36.6%)
- 2013: 137.5 million (55.5% / 43.1%)
- 2014: 157.7 million (62.5% / 48.9%)
- 2015: 176.3 million (68.8% / 54.2%)
- 2016:192.4 million (74.1% / 58.5%)

The following numbers reflect those of tablet users. By 2014, it’s predicted that over a quarter of the U.S. population will be using tablets. As tablet adoption increases, older devices will get replaced and eventually, will become more like smartphones, which typically have a single user and less sharing.

U.S. tablet users and penetration, 2010-2014:
- 2010: 13.0 million (4.2% of total population / 5.8% of internet users)
- 2011: 33.7 million (10.8% / 14.5%)
- 2012: 54.8 million (17.3% / 22.9%)
- 2013: 75.6 million (23.7% / 30.9%)
- 2014: 89.5 million (27.7% / 35.6%)

Another advantage of mobile and tablet marketing in a company’s mix is not only the benefits we spoke of above, but the ability to be truly integrated and interactive with other elements of your mix. Marketers can cross-pollinate what can be considered a traditional form of marketing with the newer forms like mobile marketing. By doing so, you can give a “facelift” to what some people might be considered “dead” forms of advertising, like print advertising.

For example, in Quarter 2/2012, the use of mobile action codes In the U.S. top print magazines rose 61% compared to the previous quarter. In comparison to last year, the print-to-mobile marketing strategy rose from 5% overall to 10% and continues to rise. Action codes in magazines right now are actually outpacing action codes in direct mail. Direct mail is typically receiving about 4.4% overall in a response rate while catalogs garner a 4.3% response rate; a direct mail letter receives an approximate 3.4%). But, with the implementation of mobile code actions, that response rate on direct mail rose from 4.5% to 5.9%.

It’s important to note something here…one of the best rules in marketing is this: don’t implement a marketing activity into your mix just because it’s the latest buzz trend. Rather, does a proper analysis of your target market, how they engage with your applicable medium and then see how the rubber will hit the road, if it does at all. The numbers we provided here are some high-level stats. There’s lots of ways to drill down and seek out further information about your target market on a much deeper level, and you should make every effort to do so. But, with some powerful data and the obvious impact both mobile and tablet technology has had and will continue to make on our society, it’s certainly something that can’t be ignored and should be considered!

In the end, what you choose in your marketing mix and what you decide to say and how you say it are all integral, critical parts in acting strategically with your message. Finding the ways to communicate your message is half the battle — figuring out what to say is the other side of it!

What’s your experience with mobile and tablet marketing? Restoration Contractors are you currently utilizing any mobile or tablet strategies? We’d love to hear your thoughts and/or experience!!

For more information about Business Development Associates, Inc., visit www.theBDAway.com.

Can Enthusiasm Be A Game Changer In Sales?

In this month’s edition of Cleanfax’s E-Newsletter, “Restoration Insider”, BDA’s President, Tim Miller, discusses how enthusiasm can make you stand apart, especially in the sales arena.

In any industry, including the restoration industry, it’s important to remember that the people you prospect can be dealing with multiple salespeople every day asking for their business. In addition, those salespeople will mostly have the same message which is: “Hi, nice to see you! Got any work? Ok, see you in a couple of weeks!”, and nothing more. So, before you even walk in the door, you are cataloged in the prospect’s mind as just another “oxygen thief” rather than someone who is a true professional and has something of value to offer them.

Part of being successful in sales is, of course, what you have to offer, but also how you deliver what you’re offering. And that’s where enthusiasm comes in. The enthusiasm you bring to the table is actually compromised of several parts, including your unwavering belief in what you’re selling, your company, curiosity and more.

CLICK HERE to read the full article, and let us know what you think about the role of enthusiasm in the sales process!

Is Your Sales Team Productive & Profitable?

Knowing whether or not your sales team is being both productive and profitable is key to driving the growth of your restoration contracting business. In many cases, we find that many owners are sending out reps into the field, and they either don’t have a pulse on what exactly they are doing out there, or, they know that their reps are busy, but not seeing the amount of sales to match the amount of busyness their reps are reporting back.

BDA President Tim Miller discusses the importance of sales people tracking their results for truly optimizing their efforts and your revenue possiblities!

Click Here To Watch the Video!

Forewarned is Forearmed: Understanding the Small Stages of Business Growth-Part 1

In our experience, business owners tend to approach growing their company as one long continuum from the day they open to the day they retire.

And, while growing the business may seem like a foregone conclusion for most entrepreneurs, they soon find out that the reality of growth is much more organic, much messier and far more likely to create new challenges that will stress the owner and his or her management team in ways they never imagined.

We often have the opportunity to see this firsthand as we help restorers grow their businesses by turning on their “marketing engine.” Even so, we are emphatic that “handling the new business will be harder than getting the new business.”

Given the fact that most restorers find growing their business in today’s market one of their biggest and most difficult challenges, they have a hard time accepting this statement. Perhaps they are so focused on having found a new way to grow that they figure that handling the growth will be a nice problem to have and they’ll figure that out as they go along.

This is a problem. They fail to realize there are distinct stages of growth, with different challenges, stressors and potential outcomes. Growing companies can greatly profit from advanced knowledge of the challenges they are likely to face at each step.

Facts of business

Before we get into these distinct stages, let’s look at some general truths about growing companies. The most important is that “growth increases complexity.” What most owners do when confronted with increased complexity is to throw people at the problem, meaning that they simply hire to add the necessary capacity.

But what is the real effect of this strategy? After all, the point of growing a business should be for the company to produce more net profit. If the increased gross profit — and therefore net profit — of a growing business is simply consumed in the salaries and related overhead expenses necessary to handle the growth, then all that a business owner has accomplished is to create a bigger, more complex set of headaches for the same net profit as before.

So, while some new labor resources may be required, the reality is that growth and its attendant complexity requires changes in the way the company operates — a new paradigm that requires new processes, systems and procedures and new ways of measuring and thinking about the business.

All of this requires a transition away from the old, comfortable, safe and yet moribund paradigm that got the business from Point A to Point B, but will not take the company from Point B to Point C, something that is likely to be extremely uncomfortable for the owner and many employees who simply may not be able to make the transition.

Another truth is that for companies to grow, the owners and management team will have to learn new skills to support that growth. Companies embarking on a growth strategy must consider how they will gain this education. There are several industry specific consultancies and programs that can help dramatically, but an intensive self-study program is highly recommended, starting with Peter Drucker’s “The Practice of Management.”

This new, more complex, more demanding paradigm will require not only a revision of all of the company’s processes but also a way of codifying those new processes and integrating them into “the way we do things around here.”

It will also require running the business “by the numbers,” and an owner and key managers must have job and overall profitability numbers in near real time in order to insure that margins are met. For this reason, growing restoration contractors simply must be looking at “enterprise” software solutions as the software backbone to support their growing companies.

There are many theories and models of small business growth, and one of the classic papers on this topic was published by Neil Churchill and Virginia Lewis in the Harvard Business Review. Understanding the stages of small business growth helps owners understand what to plan for, what changes there will be in the company’s structure, the owner’s responsibilities and focus and can serve as a way of diagnosing problems that arise.

This month, we will look at the first two stages of growth, and next month, the final three.

Stage 1: Existence

This is the start-up phase where the focus here is almost exclusively on getting enough business to start your business model.

Overhead costs will be, or should be, at a minimum because the owner will be performing most tasks personally with the help of a few employees of average skill. There will be few, if any, formal systems or planning processes as the business will be run largely “in the owner’s head.”

In the very beginning, the company’s very minimal requirements and nascent capabilities often allow the company to generate business relatively easily. This is especially the case if there is an existing business (such as a carpet cleaning operation) that can support the basic needs of the owner as he begins his foray into the brave new world of restoration.

The first crisis for a start-up will likely be managing cash flow. This is often the biggest problem and impediment to growth, causing owners to develop skills in accurate estimating, efficient management of company and sub-contractor labor so that jobs are profitable, negotiating with adjusters and policyholders for payment, understanding the impact of customer service on getting paid, etc.

This is an extremely demanding phase for any business, but perhaps even more so for restorers given the peaks and valleys nature of the workflow and the challenge of keeping a solid team on staff to do the work properly and profitably.

It is easy for restorers at this stage to want to move too fast in terms of growing their organization without putting into place the necessary systems, processes and procedures.

The people selected may be chosen more for industry familiarity and the “show up” factor (they just showed up on my doorstep — must be serendipity) than possessing the necessary management or other skills that the company will require to grow.

This can also be a time of really challenging stress for business owners, especially if they don’t have a carpet cleaning or other business to fall back on.

Stage 2: Survival

The good news here is that the company’s basic premise has proof of concept. The crisis is now one of generating a necessary profit as the company grows to the next step.

Owners are likely putting out fires on a daily basis and the toll of the start-up phase may have drained them of energy and financial resources.

If the business is growing, the problem becomes a very serious one — can the company generate enough cash flow to stay in business and add the necessary fixed expenses (equipment, trucks, technicians, first managerial position such as Project Manager) as well as maintain the current capital assets and replace them as they wear out?

Again, in the restoration industry this can be dramatically exacerbated by unforeseen circumstances like “The Winter That Wasn’t of 2011-2012″ where the expected work from frozen pipes, ice dams, etc., never materialized.

Keeping a talented crew together at this point to handle the peaks in the work is extremely challenging, and many companies at Stage 2 are unable to keep everyone working on a full-time basis. This creates a quality problem as well as massive training problems, as there can be a revolving door of technical talent.

The Project Manager at this stage is a key employee, and owners typically do everything possible to keep this person in place, often ignoring whether or not they have (or can develop) the necessary managerial qualities that will help the company grow.

At Stage 2, the company is still relatively simple; systems are still rudimentary at best, requiring the involvement of the owner in practically every decision. Planning will mostly revolve around cash flow forecasting and it is now critical that the company utilize a basic accounts receivable process to get paid as quickly as possible.

The crisis of cash flow at this stage also creates a dangerous potential pitfall for restorers. When a company is desperate for cash, it is easy for the emotional demands of running the business to spill over when negotiating payment with adjusters.

If Stage 2 companies manage their challenges effectively, they may grow to Stage 3. However, many Stage 2 companies do not meet these challenges and stay in a perpetual crisis where the owner wonders why he ever got into the restoration business in the first place. Given the boom and bust cycles of the industry, he may lurch onward from one fortuitous job to the next, hoping that the lean times in between doesn’t exceed his ability to cover payroll and stretch his suppliers.

Our experience is that many restorers can stay in this place for a long time — even 20 years — never doing what is necessary to understand and break free of Stage 2 and move on to Stage 3.

But if they are able to get past Stage 2… they will find Stage 3 quite interesting. Stay tuned for Part 2, Coming Soon!

Hiring The Right Consultant For You

If you’ve decided to hire a consultant — Congratulations! You’ve taken the first step in making the strategic and necessary changes to grow your business to the next level, or help you with some current business challenges.

But with many consultants to choose from, how do you choose the right consultant for you? Here’s a few tips on how to seek out and secure the right consultant that’s a perfect fit for you:

Assess What You Really Need
First, you need to understand the specific skillset you are looking for that aligns with the goals you want to achieve. Make sure your consultant or consulting agency offers solutions that will resolve your business challenges and at the same time, gauge their ability to understand the business and the issues. Looking at their website, social media platforms and any published works (ie: articles) are a good start to seeing how they speak about and understand your business and industry.

Also, are you looking for an advisor, implementer or both? If there is hands-on work that will be produced out of hiring the consultant, you will want to find a consultant that is also an implementation company to help make the process more fluid and your project output that much more powerful for maximum results and ROI.

Always Check Testimonials, Referrals and Current Clients

There’s several ways to obtain the opinions of those who have used the services of the consultant you are seeking out. Social media and the internet is one of the easiest methods; start by checking the consultant’s company page on LinkedIn, or head straight to their website. If the consultant has truly moved their business in the right direction, meaning they are delivering powerful results with the strategies they are implementing, they will give you a list of the consultant’s current clients who can share their experiences with you.

Which Of Their Current Clients Are Similar to Your Situation?

Restoration contracting companies come in all shapes and sizes. And, while there are some general similarities amongst them, like any business, each is unique in nature. The consultant you choose should have strategies that are tailored to your unique business situation, challenges and goals.

Be Crystal Clear About Your Objectives, and “No” is OK!

In order to make sure the consultant’s solution is a right fit, make sure that you are upfront and crystal clear about your objectives and your business situation. The right consultant for you will want to assess your situation and determine if their services are the right fit for you. Many times, a consultant will say just about “Yes, we’ve got your answers!” to anyone in order to secure the business. A great consultant does not have the fear of saying “no” or turning down the business, because they have a tailored, unique solution for a specific type of customer and want to make sure that their solution is right for your situation and challenges.

Are You Looking For a Long Term or Short Term Fix?

With the bevy of consultants to choose from, also comes the choice of the type of solution you are seeking. And while many solutions out there do well at implementing some short-term changes, it’s really just putting a band-aid on the wound, versus truly healing it. If you’re serious about implementing long-term changes that get to the core of your challenges, make sure the consultant you choose and the solution that comes with that is one that is long lasting, versus the “silver bullet” approach that is commonly sold, but rarely cures the issues in the long-term.

Another thing to consider when choosing a consultant is the exclusivity factor. Many “silver bullet”/short-term solutions are being sold to hundreds, possibly thousands of others, including your direct competitors. That can bring the value of the solution, plus the ROI on your investment in the solution, down significantly if everyone else is using the same strategy. Be sure to ask your consultant of how many people in your area are using the same solution they are trying to sell you.

How’s The Rapport?

A good consultant will want to talk with you several times to ensure that their services are a good fit for the goals you want to achieve and the challenges you are facing. If they try to sell you on the first time talking, a flag should go up that they are likely selling a blanket solution that is made for the masses versus selling a solution that was designed for a particular problem set. And that could very well be what we mentioned before – a Band-Aid that provides a short-term fix versus healing the deeper, underlying issues.

Also, while you are talking to them, make sure if you see them as a valuable partner and a critical part of getting where you want to go. Your indicators should be saying “yes, this is my consultant!” If you don’t respect them or see them as a subordinate or just any other vendor, then it’s probably not a good fit.

At BDA we talk with many restoration contractors about their business challenges. And, while we are not a perfect fit for everyone, the restoration contractors that usually come to us find the following issues:

• What grew their company from Point A to Point B is not working to take them from Point B to Point C.

• They have stopped growing or are actively shrinking,

• Or, they are growing but want to grow faster,

• They have full time salespeople but they don’t know if their activities are actually growing the business,

• Ultimately, our clients want to predictably control their company’s growth and not be at the mercy of program work, the weather or good fortune.

If you are facing any of the above issues, give us a call at 773-294-7400 or email us at info@theBDAway.com. We will be happy to talk with you to see if BDA is the right fit for your company!



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